Content Marketing & Social Business Article Roundup Week of 1.23.12

dave huffman content marketing social media

Photo Credit: Martin Pettitt on Flickr

 

Below are some articles from the week of 1.23.12 – 1.27.12 that I thought were super awesome.  The really cool thing, for me, is that – with the exception of D.M. Scott, I hadn’t previously heard of some of these folks.

Care to help me?  In the comments following the article, share a link to something that stuck with you last week.  If not, that’s cool too.  Just wanting to spread the love a bit.

Here we goooooo.

Content Chemistry by Orbit Media Studios

This is awesome, really smart, and I bet you everyone who read it sort of smacked their forehead and wished they would have came up with the idea of doing this periodic table of content.  Here is what Orbit says about the table:

Content is made up of pieces.  And pieces can be broken down into smaller pieces or combined into larger pieces, just like the elements on the Periodic Table.  Thinking about your content as particles will give you ideas on how to quickly create new content by “atomizing” your existing content into smaller pieces or combining into larger compounds.

Go here to read their article and check out the Periodic Table of Content

Thinking Right (and Left) About Content Marketing by D.M. Scott

This one really hit home for me for a few reasons.  One, because my undergrad is in Psychology and I spent a few years working in the field.  Two, because as much as we talk about building and targeting personas with our content, I’ve never really read someone addressing the right/left brained issue.  Below, David summarizes what he means:

The best websites, blogs, and social pages (Facebook and G+ for example) include a combination of text content, images, video and charts. Your goal is to create a mix so that people who are visual have an infographic or photo and those who are analytical might have text and numerical charts.

Go here to read the full article on David’s blog, WebInkNow.com

Reblogged Vs. Retweet: A Case for the Former by Zemanta

This article builds the case that Reblogging does more for building social currency and online conversation by allowing us more room to work with to add our own thoughts (rather than 140 characters), and lending a longer shelf-life to the content we’re sharing (since the average tweet/RT lasts only an hour or so).  Here’s a quote from the article:

Reblogging isn’t just a potent means of secondary content promotion, it makes quoting others easier and consequently we can expand on the reblogged blog post and continue/build the conversation. Our arguments aren’t lost by a “sound bite” and we can take time to argue our case. This is how we make ourselves more credible, no matter the topic or the nature of our blog.

Go here to read the full article on the Zemanta blog

Why Are So Few Internal Social Networks Deemed a Success?  by Adi Gaskell

This one slapped me upside the head because I’ve been there – feverishly pushing something like Yammer or even a custom solution of some sort, desperately wanting to believe that the team would communicate better if we had such a thing.  But, after minimal buy-in and even less participation, the network usually dies off quick.

As the article quotes, the bottom line is that “People view it as one more place to have look to get information.”

Not only a quick background on why internal social networks haven’t been successful, but the article also gives 6 ways to give your internal network a better chance at survival.

Go here to read the full article on Social Business News

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So, that is basically the stuff that got me thinking this week.

Care to share an article or two you think I should have highlighted here?  Leave a link and a little about the article in the comments below.